Home

2019 TEACHING HISTORY SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

Tuesday Abstracts | Wednesday Abstracts |
Register | Back to PROGRAM Page

 DAY 1 - Tuesday 9 April 2019

ABSTRACTS

SESSION CODE DETAILS

Tuesday

 

KEYNOTE: Evaluating the Legacy of the 1970s/1980s Revolution in History Education
Christine Counsell, Curriculum Consultant and Former Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Cambridge

Tuesday

PANEL & DISCUSSION: Historical Thinking for History Teachers
Professor Tim Allender, University of Sydney
Associate Professor Anna Clark, University of Technology Sydney
Associate Professor Robert Parkes, University of Newcastle

Tuesday 1A

 

Does 'source work' work?
Dr Paul Kiem, HTANSW & UTS Sydney

How well does 'source work' work? This session will aim to promote discussion around what is achieved when sources are used in history teaching and assessment. Does it automatically result in students 'working like historians' or acquiring 'higher order transferable skills'? After a brief survey of how historians work, it will offer an evaluation of common classroom and assessment practices before using examples to suggest a number of approaches to working productively with sources. The examples will be drawn largely from Australian and Modern History.

Tuesday 1B

Handling History: Practical steps for integrating material cultural analysis into history education
Dr Craig Barker, Nicholson Museum, University of Sydney

Hands on sessions of handling artefacts in controlled environments has been a mainstay of museum education programs for decades now - an opportunity for students to directly engage with historical material through the process of touch. A wealth of studies prove the value of student interaction with materiality, and the opportunity to handle history; to provide a tangible physicality to complement the conceptual historical framework that is being studied.

In this presentation I would like to cover how material cultural can be best utilised for student engagement and discuss some of the methodologies of archaeological education practices. Using Middle Eastern archaeological material I will cover how we can construct approaches of critical analysis of the past and develop interpretive techniques, teamwork and problem solving skills. In the presentation I will also discuss how these techniques are not only of use for ancient historical material but also for modern historical studies; and how material culture can be integrated with other historical approaches to provide a far more holistic and nuanced understanding of the past.

I will then cover some of the practical issues for recreating a hands-on artefact workshop; pitfalls to avoid, and discuss how 3D printing and digital resources can also be used in such educational sessions and explore how object-based learning is now far more accessible and democratised.

Tuesday 1C

 

PRIMARY: Thinking and Understanding in Primary History
David Boon, Tas DoE and THTA

Approaches to thinking and understanding in the primary school need to consider students' levels of development and maturation, as well as the curriculum in use. This session will provide practical examples of the thinking of primary students and approaches to developing thinking and understanding in different year levels of primary history.

Curriculum approaches in Australia have traditionally viewed history as an area of study in which students moved outwards from a personal view to a global view. Questions have been raised about the continued reliance on such a curriculum model and the implications this has for the development of student thinking and understanding. While teachers cannot always directly decide the curriculum content, they can choose the way they interpret it and plan for learning. Whatever the curriculum content, it is always possible to further enhance development of thinking and understanding through careful planning around how students go about exploring and investigating a focus of inquiry drawn from the curriculum. The examples utilised will be general in nature so that they might be applied to any history curriculum model.

Tuesday 1D, 2D, 3D

and

Wednesday
1D, 2D

Library Tour 

This short tour will offer a glimpse of the State Library galleries. Highlights include Paintings from the Collection, Sydney Elders: Continuing Aboriginal Stories and the UNESCO Six, featuring the library's UNESCO World Heritage collections ranging from First Fleet journals to diaries of World War I. More detail can be found on the State Library's webpage: https://www.sl.nsw.gov.au/whats-on

Tuesday 2A

 

Historical Thinking Online
James Goulding, Unviersity of Sydney

Historical thinking is a complex activity that is deeply rooted in the way we know and understand the past. Existing research indicates that it is context dependent, with factors such as learning settings, learning communities, and learning tools shaping understandings of what constitutes credible historical information. Despite the emergence of the internet as a major site of historical learning, there has been little research on how the internet may be shaping historical understanding. This paper will report on the findings of a qualitative research project that investigated novice and expert evaluations of digital historical sources, and found that the type of thinking occurring did not fit neatly within existing models of either historical thinking or website evaluation.

Tuesday 2B

 

Socrates' Heir: Having student-led conversations with the Harkness Method
Alison Bedford and Emma Kann, The Glennine School, Toowoomba, QLD

Many teachers adopt the Socratic Method as a model for student conversation. However, at its core this is still teacher-driven, as they provide the questions in order to achieve a pre-determined outcome. This presentation will outline our recent experiences in adopting the Harkness Method, which fosters a more genuine student-driven mode of conversation and provides a strong scaffold for the gradual release of responsibility and decision-making to the students. Our initial experiences have shown that if given full control, students develop not only a deep knowledge of historical content but also refine their ability to engage critically with historical source material. Beyond these discipline-specific skills, they also work collaboratively to reach decisions and make judgements, provide thoughtful feedback to their peers and both lead and participate in conversation. Many of these skills transcend the History classroom and better equip our students as they become active members of our democracy and of the global community, reflecting the 21st century skills of the Australian Curriculum. We see the Harkness method as a valuable addition to our repertoire of learning experiences we can offer our History students.

Tuesday 2C

 

PRIMARY: Historical Literacy guiding Interdisciplinary Units
Maree Whiteley, AISWA & HTAWA

What does Historical Literacy look like in a primary classroom? In our attempts to 'cover the curriculum' and 'tick all the boxes', have we unconsciously navigated our students away from 'thinking like an historian', especially with our recent focus on the STEM subjects? The answer must surely be found in a 'big picture' view of the curriculum, where conceptual understandings, critical thinking and a culture of inquiry leads to interdisciplinary links and deep learning. Guided by the work of Taylor and Young (2003) on Historical Literacy, this session will refocus our attention back to the discipline of History, where numerous links to future-focused learning and 21st century skills must guide our planning for meaningful, interdisciplinary units of work for every primary classroom.

Tuesday 3A

 

Innovative Approaches to the historical analysis in Stage 6 Ancient and Modern History
Emily Shanahan, North Beaches Christian School

This presentation explores a range of ways to develop critical and creative thinking through historical analysis. An overview of different approaches will provide insight into differentiating learning, with consideration given to multi-modal presentations. After exploring different approaches, deeper insight into embedding the historical analysis into the Personality section of the Ancient History Syllabus will be provided. The historical analysis provides an opportunity for students to develop a reasoned argument, considering a range of evidence. While it can be incorporated into any of the Year 12 topics, tips will be provided on how to maximise learning opportunities while ensuring the focus is student centred, engaging and timed appropriately.

Tuesday 3B

 

PANEL: Pre-service History Teacher Education in NSW
James Goulding, Unviersity of Sydney, and Jonathon Dallimore, UNSW

This panel aims to explore some of the opportunities and issues surrounding the training of pre-service history teachers in NSW and beyond. It is designed for anyone with an interest in teacher training, history methods, supervising practicum students and contributing to the improvement of pre-service history teacher training. The session will open with brief contributions from the panellists. This will be followed by questions and discussion.

Tuesday 3C

 

PRIMARY: Assessment in Primary History
David Boon, Tas DoE and THTA

While curriculum documents for history in Australia now focus on knowledge and understanding as well as inquiry and skills, assessment often favours final knowledge and understanding over inquiry and skills. In reality the two threads are inseparable. This session will demonstrate how both formative and summative assessment can be embedded throughout an inquiry and not just in an isolated assessment task.

Assessment of history is sometimes reduced to a focus on the culminating piece of work or a common assessment task for the purposes of moderation. Such tasks often provide more insights into the literacy and numeracy skills of the student than their knowledge, understanding and skills in history. It is an approach which does not always consider the questions students developed, their capacity to locate and analyse sources, skills of observation, consideration of different points of view and conflicting accounts of the past. This session will provide practical examples across the primary years showing how both formative and summative assessment opportunities might be utilised at all stages of the inquiry process.

Cocktail

Conference Cocktail Reception: 4pm, State Library Learning Centre
BOOKING ESSENTIAL - Cost $20 per person (GST inclusive). Partners are welcome.

Back to top

 

DAY 2 - Wedensday 10 April 2019

ABSTRACTS

SESSION CODE DETAILS

Wednesday

Workshop Session: What happens to pupils'historical thinking when they know more and how do we make it happen? ... Transforming pupils' access to challenging history through attention to substantive knowledge

Christine Counsell, Curriculum Consultant and Former Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Cambridge

Wednesday

Every Picture Tells a Story
Richard Neville, Mitchell Librarian and Director Education & Scholarship, State Library of NSW

Wednesday 1A

The First Australians: The Indigenous Priority
Dr Rosalie Triolo, Monash University & HTAV

Numerous histories, and not only at Years 9 and 10 level, offer opportunities for inclusion of the cross-curriculum priority of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures. By focusing on the priority, this workshop seeks to foster big-picture views of Australian and world history, the avoidance of generalisations, and the use of inclusive language. Teachers who may not have academic background in Australian Indigenous histories and cultures will be introduced to background readings, classroom resources, useful organisations and engaging activities selected specifically to support their and their students' learning.

Wednesday
1B

Close Encounters: Out of Classroom Learning Experiences
Catherine Bavell, Sydney Girls' High School

Museums are transformative sites of learning. The past and the way we engage with it can alter the way in which we understand ourselves, others and our place in the world. Teaching History is about engaging students with the world outside the classroom and encouraging them to be curious about the past.

Excursions to museums are a common activity within Australian schools. They are rich in pedagogical power and it is this attempt to take History out of the textbook and engage students as active learners whose construction of historical knowledge is based on experiential learning, hands on artefact analysis, storytelling and role play, that transforms the discipline of History from one of nostalgia to one of debate and critical thinking.

This presentation weaves theory and practice in order to integrate engagement with museums into teaching and learning programs K-12. By examining a range of online, artefact and display based museums, memorials and monuments and historic house museums, History will not only come alive for our students, but it will ignite their curiosity about the past and they will learn to do history for themselves.

Wednesday 1C

Practice what you preach? Teacher Professional Learning and planning for growth
Melissa Riley, University of Tasmania

Undertaking professional learning has long been recognised as an important aspect of professional growth for teachers. With a minimum number professional learning hours now required to maintain status of accredited teacher in New South Wales, teachers are looking to spend this time engaged in meaningful learning that will have a positive impact on praxis. However, is this happening in reality? Does the professional learning available to teachers meet what is needed or expected by them? Where does professional learning for History teachers sit in the context of theories of andragogy? When the dust settles, how effectively do these sessions translate to classroom settings?

Participants in this session will engage practically with all aspects of professional learning, discuss and reflect with their peers on their own practice, and leave with an individualised Personal Learning Plan (PLP) to help map their professional development for 2019 and beyond.

Wednesday 2A 

Is Australian History boring?
Paddy Lunney, Sydney Girls' High School

Is Australian history boring? According to my Year 9 class the answer is a resounding 'Yes'. This presentation will examine the content, structure and delivery of Australian history from K-12 in an attempt to understand how students in Australia engage with their own history. The focus of national and state history curriculums is often the subject of great debate amongst politicians and the media but what impact is this having on the classroom, if any? The aim of looking at Australian history, as it is taught in our schools, is to begin a discussion about the value of learning history and the role that teachers have to play.

Wednesday 2B

Historical Consciousness in Teachers and Students - History Extension and the Writings of Jorn Rosen
Barry Smith, Waverley College & University of Newcastle

The purpose of this presentation is to focus on Continental ideas and teaching uses for historical consciousness, in particular Jorn Rosen's four narrative types. German and Nordic uses of historical consciousness for the teaching and learning of school-based history differ from Anglo-democratic approaches in the United Kingdom, North America, Canada and Australia. It is argued that school history is a signature pedagogy separate from academic history as taught in universities, that asks students to explore how historians work and requires an understanding of historiography. The unique subject of History Extension and Rosen's narrative types are used to show how the pedagogical content knowledge of the teacher helps develop historical consciousness and benefits for students. This presentation will also address the relative lack of exposure and understanding of Rosen's ideas on historical consciousness in Australia, and provide a different framework in which to consider questions of historical narratives and historiography for both teachers and students.

Wednesday 2C

The Cognitive Apprenticeship: A praxis-driven approach in empowering pre-service history teachers to successfully teach history
Dr Emma Shaw, University of Newcastle

This presentation outlines how we teach a second-year history education course at the University of Newcastle. Coordinated by Associate Professor Robert Parkes, the Specialist Studies in History 1 course is developed and taught through the lens of the Cognitive Apprenticeship framework and is strongly aligned to the principles of outcomes-based education. Through a series of engaging lectures and tutorials, the course is theoretically rigorous with practical applications. In teaching the course, we make the invisible thoughts of the expert (teacher) visible to the novice (student) through repeated cycles of demonstration/modelling, scaffolded paired tasks for students, and finally, independent mastery and application of history teaching methodologies and processes. We have found that there is a strong correlation between achieving success in the course and classroom attendance, and our students report a dramatic increase in their confidence and ability to plan and prepare for teaching history in schools.

Back to top


Tuesday Abstracts
 | Wednesday Abstracts | 
Register | Back to PROGRAM Page

 DAY 1 - Tuesday 9 April 2019

ABSTRACTS

SESSION CODE DETAILS

Tuesday

 

KEYNOTE: Evaluating the Legacy of the 1970s/1980s Revolution in History Education
Christine Counsell, Curriculum Consultant and Former Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Cambridge

Tuesday

PANEL & DISCUSSION: Historical Thinking for History Teachers
Professor Tim Allender, University of Sydney
Associate Professor Anna Clark, University of Technology Sydney
Associate Professor Robert Parkes, University of Newcastle

Tuesday 1A

 

Does 'source work' work?
Dr Paul Kiem, HTANSW & UTS Sydney

How well does �source work� work? This session will aim to promote discussion around what is achieved when sources are used in history teaching and assessment. Does it automatically result in students �working like historians� or acquiring �higher order transferable skills�? After a brief survey of how historians work, it will offer an evaluation of common classroom and assessment practices before using examples to suggest a number of approaches to working productively with sources. The examples will be drawn largely from Australian and Modern History.

Tuesday 1B

Handling History: Practical steps for integrating material cultural analysis into history education
Dr Craig Barker, Nicholson Museum, University of Sydney

Hands on sessions of handling artefacts in controlled environments has been a mainstay of museum education programs for decades now � an opportunity for students to directly engage with historical material through the process of touch. A wealth of studies prove the value of student interaction with materiality, and the opportunity to handle history; to provide a tangible physicality to complement the conceptual historical framework that is being studied.

In this presentation I would like to cover how material cultural can be best utilised for student engagement and discuss some of the methodologies of archaeological education practices. Using Middle Eastern archaeological material I will cover how we can construct approaches of critical analysis of the past and develop interpretive techniques, teamwork and problem solving skills. In the presentation I will also discuss how these techniques are not only of use for ancient historical material but also for modern historical studies; and how material culture can be integrated with other historical approaches to provide a far more holistic and nuanced understanding of the past.

I will then cover some of the practical issues for recreating a hands-on artefact workshop; pitfalls to avoid, and discuss how 3D printing and digital resources can also be used in such educational sessions and explore how object-based learning is now far more accessible and democratised.

Tuesday 1C

 

PRIMARY: Thinking and Understanding in Primary History
David Boon, Tas DoE and THTA

Approaches to thinking and understanding in the primary school need to consider students� levels of development and maturation, as well as the curriculum in use. This session will provide practical examples of the thinking of primary students and approaches to developing thinking and understanding in different year levels of primary history.

Curriculum approaches in Australia have traditionally viewed history as an area of study in which students moved outwards from a personal view to a global view. Questions have been raised about the continued reliance on such a curriculum model and the implications this has for the development of student thinking and understanding. While teachers cannot always directly decide the curriculum content, they can choose the way they interpret it and plan for learning. Whatever the curriculum content, it is always possible to further enhance development of thinking and understanding through careful planning around how students go about exploring and investigating a focus of inquiry drawn from the curriculum. The examples utilised will be general in nature so that they might be applied to any history curriculum model.

Tuesday 1D, 2D, 3D

and

Wednesday
1D, 2D

Library Tour 

This short tour will offer a glimpse of the State Library galleries. Highlights include Paintings from the Collection, Sydney Elders: Continuing Aboriginal Stories and the UNESCO Six, featuring the library�s UNESCO World Heritage collections ranging from First Fleet journals to diaries of World War I. More detail can be found on the State Library�s webpage: https://www.sl.nsw.gov.au/whats-on

Tuesday 2A

 

Historical Thinking Online
James Goulding, Unviersity of Sydney

Historical thinking is a complex activity that is deeply rooted in the way we know and understand the past. Existing research indicates that it is context dependent, with factors such as learning settings, learning communities, and learning tools shaping understandings of what constitutes credible historical information. Despite the emergence of the internet as a major site of historical learning, there has been little research on how the internet may be shaping historical understanding. This paper will report on the findings of a qualitative research project that investigated novice and expert evaluations of digital historical sources, and found that the type of thinking occurring did not fit neatly within existing models of either historical thinking or website evaluation.

Tuesday 2B

 

Socrates' Heir: Having student-led conversations with the Harkness Method
Alison Bedford and Emma Kann, The Glennine School, Toowoomba, QLD

Many teachers adopt the Socratic Method as a model for student conversation. However, at its core this is still teacher-driven, as they provide the questions in order to achieve a pre-determined outcome. This presentation will outline our recent experiences in adopting the Harkness Method, which fosters a more genuine student-driven mode of conversation and provides a strong scaffold for the gradual release of responsibility and decision-making to the students. Our initial experiences have shown that if given full control, students develop not only a deep knowledge of historical content but also refine their ability to engage critically with historical source material. Beyond these discipline-specific skills, they also work collaboratively to reach decisions and make judgements, provide thoughtful feedback to their peers and both lead and participate in conversation. Many of these skills transcend the History classroom and better equip our students as they become active members of our democracy and of the global community, reflecting the 21st century skills of the Australian Curriculum. We see the Harkness method as a valuable addition to our repertoire of learning experiences we can offer our History students.

Tuesday 2C

 

PRIMARY: Historical Literacy guiding Interdisciplinary Units
Maree Whiteley, AISWA & HTAWA

What does Historical Literacy look like in a primary classroom? In our attempts to �cover the curriculum� and �tick all the boxes�, have we unconsciously navigated our students away from �thinking like an historian�, especially with our recent focus on the STEM subjects? The answer must surely be found in a �big picture� view of the curriculum, where conceptual understandings, critical thinking and a culture of inquiry leads to interdisciplinary links and deep learning. Guided by the work of Taylor and Young (2003) on Historical Literacy, this session will refocus our attention back to the discipline of History, where numerous links to future-focused learning and 21st century skills must guide our planning for meaningful, interdisciplinary units of work for every primary classroom.

Tuesday 3A

 

Innovative Approaches to the historical analysis in Stage 6 Ancient and Modern History
Emily Shanahan, North Beaches Christian School

This presentation explores a range of ways to develop critical and creative thinking through historical analysis. An overview of different approaches will provide insight into differentiating learning, with consideration given to multi-modal presentations. After exploring different approaches, deeper insight into embedding the historical analysis into the Personality section of the Ancient History Syllabus will be provided. The historical analysis provides an opportunity for students to develop a reasoned argument, considering a range of evidence. While it can be incorporated into any of the Year 12 topics, tips will be provided on how to maximise learning opportunities while ensuring the focus is student centred, engaging and timed appropriately.

Tuesday 3B

 

PANEL: Pre-service History Teacher Education in NSW
James Goulding, Unviersity of Sydney, and Jonathon Dallimore, UNSW

This panel aims to explore some of the opportunities and issues surrounding the training of pre-service history teachers in NSW and beyond. It is designed for anyone with an interest in teacher training, history methods, supervising practicum students and contributing to the improvement of pre-service history teacher training. The session will open with brief contributions from the panellists. This will be followed by questions and discussion.

Tuesday 3C

 

PRIMARY: Assessment in Primary History
David Boon, Tas DoE and THTA

While curriculum documents for history in Australia now focus on knowledge and understanding as well as inquiry and skills, assessment often favours final knowledge and understanding over inquiry and skills. In reality the two threads are inseparable. This session will demonstrate how both formative and summative assessment can be embedded throughout an inquiry and not just in an isolated assessment task.

Assessment of history is sometimes reduced to a focus on the culminating piece of work or a common assessment task for the purposes of moderation. Such tasks often provide more insights into the literacy and numeracy skills of the student than their knowledge, understanding and skills in history. It is an approach which does not always consider the questions students developed, their capacity to locate and analyse sources, skills of observation, consideration of different points of view and conflicting accounts of the past. This session will provide practical examples across the primary years showing how both formative and summative assessment opportunities might be utilised at all stages of the inquiry process.

Cocktail

Conference Cocktail Reception: 4pm, State Library Learning Centre
BOOKING ESSENTIAL - Cost $20 per person (GST inclusive). Partners are welcome.

Back to top

 

DAY 2 - Wedensday 10 April 2019

ABSTRACTS

SESSION CODE DETAILS

Wednesday

Workshop Session: What happens to pupils'historical thinking when they know more and how do we make it happen? ... Transforming pupils' access to challenging history through attention to substantive knowledge

Christine Counsell, Curriculum Consultant and Former Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Cambridge

Wednesday

Every Picture Tells a Story
Richard Neville, Mitchell Librarian and Director Education & Scholarship, State Library of NSW

Wednesday 1A

The First Australians: The Indigenous Priority
Dr Rosalie Triolo, Monash University & HTAV

Numerous histories, and not only at Years 9 and 10 level, offer opportunities for inclusion of the cross-curriculum priority of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures. By focusing on the priority, this workshop seeks to foster big-picture views of Australian and world history, the avoidance of generalisations, and the use of inclusive language. Teachers who may not have academic background in Australian Indigenous histories and cultures will be introduced to background readings, classroom resources, useful organisations and engaging activities selected specifically to support their and their students� learning.

Wednesday
1B

Close Encounters: Out of Classroom Learning Experiences
Catherine Bavell, Sydney Girls' High School

Museums are transformative sites of learning. The past and the way we engage with it can alter the way in which we understand ourselves, others and our place in the world. Teaching History is about engaging students with the world outside the classroom and encouraging them to be curious about the past.

Excursions to museums are a common activity within Australian schools. They are rich in pedagogical power and it is this attempt to take History out of the textbook and engage students as active learners whose construction of historical knowledge is based on experiential learning, hands on artefact analysis, storytelling and role play, that transforms the discipline of History from one of nostalgia to one of debate and critical thinking.

This presentation weaves theory and practice in order to integrate engagement with museums into teaching and learning programs K-12. By examining a range of online, artefact and display based museums, memorials and monuments and historic house museums, History will not only come alive for our students, but it will ignite their curiosity about the past and they will learn to do history for themselves.

Wednesday 1C

Practice what you preach? Teacher Professional Learning and planning for growth
Melissa Riley, University of Tasmania

Undertaking professional learning has long been recognised as an important aspect of professional growth for teachers. With a minimum number professional learning hours now required to maintain status of accredited teacher in New South Wales, teachers are looking to spend this time engaged in meaningful learning that will have a positive impact on praxis. However, is this happening in reality? Does the professional learning available to teachers meet what is needed or expected by them? Where does professional learning for History teachers sit in the context of theories of andragogy? When the dust settles, how effectively do these sessions translate to classroom settings?

Participants in this session will engage practically with all aspects of professional learning, discuss and reflect with their peers on their own practice, and leave with an individualised Personal Learning Plan (PLP) to help map their professional development for 2019 and beyond.

Wednesday 2A 

Is Australian History boring?
Paddy Lunney, Sydney Girls' High School

Is Australian history boring? According to my Year 9 class the answer is a resounding �Yes�. This presentation will examine the content, structure and delivery of Australian history from K-12 in an attempt to understand how students in Australia engage with their own history. The focus of national and state history curriculums is often the subject of great debate amongst politicians and the media but what impact is this having on the classroom, if any? The aim of looking at Australian history, as it is taught in our schools, is to begin a discussion about the value of learning history and the role that teachers have to play.

Wednesday 2B

Historical Consciousness in Teachers and Students - History Extension and the Writings of J�rn R�sen
Barry Smith, Waverley College & University of Newcastle

The purpose of this presentation is to focus on Continental ideas and teaching uses for historical consciousness, in particular J�rn R�sen�s four narrative types. German and Nordic uses of historical consciousness for the teaching and learning of school-based history differ from Anglo-democratic approaches in the United Kingdom, North America, Canada and Australia. It is argued that school history is a signature pedagogy separate from academic history as taught in universities, that asks students to explore how historians work and requires an understanding of historiography. The unique subject of History Extension and R�sen�s narrative types are used to show how the pedagogical content knowledge of the teacher helps develop historical consciousness and benefits for students. This presentation will also address the relative lack of exposure and understanding of R�sen�s ideas on historical consciousness in Australia, and provide a different framework in which to consider questions of historical narratives and historiography for both teachers and students.

Wednesday 2C

The Cognitive Apprenticeship: A praxis-driven approach in empowering pre-service history teachers to successfully teach history
Dr Emma Shaw, University of Newcastle

This presentation outlines how we teach a second-year history education course at the University of Newcastle. Coordinated by Associate Professor Robert Parkes, the Specialist Studies in History 1 course is developed and taught through the lens of the Cognitive Apprenticeship framework and is strongly aligned to the principles of outcomes-based education. Through a series of engaging lectures and tutorials, the course is theoretically rigorous with practical applications. In teaching the course, we make the invisible thoughts of the expert (teacher) visible to the novice (student) through repeated cycles of demonstration/modelling, scaffolded paired tasks for students, and finally, independent mastery and application of history teaching methodologies and processes. We have found that there is a strong correlation between achieving success in the course and classroom attendance, and our students report a dramatic increase in their confidence and ability to plan and prepare for teaching history in schools.

Back to top

 

 

newsequences

achlink

HTA MEDIA

facebooklogo   twitterlogo   youtube logo-square

   itunes logo  soundcloud

academytravel

Accredited PD for History Teachers

More details

slm h reds2

Immerse your students in the past with excursions across our historic houses & museums

nationalmuseumofaustralia

National Museum of Australia
Classroom Resources

ptclogo